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Cranberry-Apple Sprouted Buckwheat Cereal

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Sprouted Buckwheat Cereal[Raw, Vegetarian, Gluten-Free, Dairy-Free]

Buckwheat is an unbelievably healthy food. While this comes as no surprise, we had no idea just how healthy buckwheat was until we started doing some research for this post. Not only is it gluten-free, but a single cup of sprouted buckwheat comes in at around 200 calories and offers almost 13 grams of protein. Along with a variety of other vitamins and minerals, manganese, magnesium, and the mood-boosting amino acid tryptophan are all found in abundance in buckwheat. It has been proven to stabilize blood sugar and keep hunger at bay for hours.

This recipe technically requires 3 days of prep time for sprouting the buckwheat. But the sprouting is an easy process and the recipe itself takes less than 5 minutes to mix up. It’s so delicious, filling, and good for you – what more could you ask for in a bowl for breakfast?

You’ll Need: a 12 oz. glass jar for sprouting

INGREDIENTS [makes 4 servings]

2 c. sprouted buckwheat 
1 Tbsp. cinnamon powder
1 apple [diced] 1/2 c. unsweetened dried cranberries 
2 Tbsp. raw honey

Process of Sprouting Buckwheat

1. Measure 3/4 cup of buckwheat groats into jar and add just enough water to cover the buckwheat. Allow the jar to sit in a safe place for 2-3 hours.

2. Strain the water from the jar. Rinse the buckwheat by filling with cool water jar and straining again.

3. Allow the jar to sit for 3 days at room temperature, rinsing 3 times per day [as explained in step 2 above.] Before you use it, rinse the buckwheat one final time.

Sprouted Buckwheat Cereal

When 3 days have passed, it’s time to have a bowl of cereal! Core and dice 1 apple and set aside. [We used a Fuji, but Granny Smith or another tart variety would be delicious, too!]  Our cranberries were on the too-big side, so we chopped them into small pieces for more even distribution.

Sprouted Buckwheat Cereal

Measure 2 cups of sprouted buckwheat into a bowl then add raw honey, cinnamon, apple, and cranberries. You’ll notice that the amount of sprouts is much larger than what you started with – that’s normal – not a typo!  Mix it all together and enjoy!

Sprouted Buckwheat Cereal

Unlike some other types of sprouts, buckwheat does not have an earthy or sour flavor. Nothing against other sprouts, but that just wouldn’t play well with the other flavors of this breakfast dish. Another bonus: buckwheat groats are quite inexpensive! You’ll probably have leftover sprouts – they store in the fridge for about 1 week. More cereal, anyone?

Sprouted Buckwheat Cereal

This recipe was inspired by a post on FoodMatters.tv.

Print

Cranberry-Apple Sprouted Buckwheat Cereal

Raw, Gluten-Free, Dairy-Free

  • Author: The Fitchen
Scale

Ingredients

  • 2 c. sprouted buckwheat
  • 1 Tbsp. cinnamon powder
  • 1 apple [diced]
  • 1/2 c. unsweetened dried cranberries
  • 2 Tbsp. raw honey

Instructions

Sprouting the buckwheat

  1. 1. Measure 3/4 cup of buckwheat groats into jar and add just enough water to cover the buckwheat. Allow the jar to sit in a safe place for 2-3 hours.
  2. 2. Strain the water from the jar. Rinse the buckwheat by filling with cool water jar and straining again.
  3. 3. Allow the jar to sit for 3 days at room temperature, rinsing 3 times per day [as explained in step 2 above.] Before you use it, rinse the buckwheat one final time.

Cereal

  1. 1. Core and dice 1 apple and set aside.
  2. 2. Measure 2 cups of sprouted buckwheat into a bowl then add raw honey, cinnamon, apple, and cranberries. Mix it all together and enjoy!

Notes

  • Sprouting time is 3 days. Recipe time is 5 minutes.

Nutrition

  • Serving Size: 4
  • Calories: 391
  • Sugar: 23
  • Sodium: 11
  • Fat: 3
  • Saturated Fat: 1
  • Unsaturated Fat: 2
  • Trans Fat: 0
  • Carbohydrates: 91
  • Protein: 10
  • Cholesterol: 0

What do you think?

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10 Comments
  • Andy
    February 17, 2014

    Wow. So many benefits to sprouted buckwheat! So I had to try it. But even the health food co-op near me didn’t have it. So I ordered it in bulk on amazon. Now I’m sitting here with my first bowl, and between the copious amounts of cinnamon in this recipe and the apparent texture of sprouted buckwheat, this dish is ULTRA GRITTY. tastes good but I’m a texture freak and don’t think I can get past the texture. Other folks might not mind as much. On the other hand I now know how easy it is to do one’s own sprouting and I’ll be doing this a lot more now. Maybe if I can finally find a local enough source of raw milk I’ll start making my own yogurt too. Thanks for the experiment! The rest of the buckwheat won’t go to waste. I’ll just sprout it and make bread out of it. Got a good recipe for that?

  • Casey
    September 11, 2013

    Hi friends! I’ve been obsessing over your blog as someone who’s thinking about taking up a low FODMAP diet to manage my stomach problems. (it involves a lot of preparing-my-own-food, which I am not-so-skilled at). A lot of your recipes would fit the FODMAP criteria–and look delicious–except they have maybe 1-2 ingredients that don’t work (often, honey, cashew, avocado, garlic–these are all no-no’s which is terrifying for me because these things are delicious). Since i know nothing about cooking, i don’t know what to use instead nor if the recipe would work.

    would you guys consider incorporating FODMAP friendly alternatives and recipes? there are some resources out there, but even between the few that are there is conflicting information–it’s very frustrating!

    • thefitchen
      September 13, 2013

      Food sensitivities, allergies, and intolerances are no fun. We totally understand where you’re coming from! We don’t know much about FODMAP, but we will do some research on it and see what it’s all about. We’re so glad you like our recipes.

      If you ever have a question about substitution in any recipe, feel free to ask! We’ll do our best to come up with a good replacement. :)

      And don’t knock your skills in the kitchen — practice makes perfect!